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Sport Management

Earn a Professional Sport Management Degree

Sports are no longer “just a game.” The sports industry is BIG business. Sport management oversees relationships between players, coaches, fans, owners, media, directors, operations and event management.  

Sport management exists where the business and sports worlds collide. The interdisciplinary field is where you will tackle elements of accounting, economics, marketing, law, communication, psychology, publicity, coaching, and of course, sports.

Study Sport Marketing, Law, Business and Public Policy

Many colleges offer a degree in sport management – but you won’t find the mentoring experience that is available to you as an Urbana University student. At Urbana, you’ll have access to faculty members who are eager to share the breadth of their experience with you. Our Sport Management majors learn fundamentals and then apply them in real world experiences by working with our athletic program and managing our wellness center. Moreover, our internship program is the conduit for students to gain valuable experiential learning leading to industry exposure and employment.

Curriculum & Course Descriptions

120 Semester Hours
Fundamental General Education Core (24 hours)
English Composition (3 hours)

Choose a minimum of 3 semester hours from:

ENG 120 - College Writing (4)
In this course, students acquire the writing competence necessary for conducting and presenting research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all of their courses. The course also emphasizes the elements of good writing style, appropriate grammar and mechanics, clarity of language, and logical and cohesive development. It culminates in submission of a documented research paper.
Mathematics (3 hours)

Select:

MATH 215 - Statistical Concepts (4)
This course introduces the student to statistics with business applications. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; graphical displays of data; linear regression; basic probability concepts; binomial and normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. These topics will be covered using a basic knowledge of algebra and Microsoft Excel.

*Choose either MATH 140 Introduction to Quantitative Reasoning or MATH 150 Fundamental Algebra as the prerequisite to MATH 215. Course can count as a University Elective.

Sciences (6 hours)

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from the Science discipline.

One must have a laboratory component.

Social and Behavioral Sciences (6 hours)

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

SOCL 110 - Introduction to Sociology (4)
Sociology is the scientific study of group behavior - whether the groups are dyads, small groups, associations, bureaucracies, societies, publics, aggregates, social movements, or mobs, etc. This introductory course introduces the student to sociological principles and theoretical perspectives that facilitate understanding the norms, values, structure and process of the various types of groups into which people organize. The course focuses on applying the scientific method to studying social problems (e.g. poverty, crime, sexism and racism) and basic institutions (i.e. family, government, economy, religion, education). Students will develop their "sociological imagination" as a way of understanding what their lives are and can be in relation to the larger social forces at work in local, national, and international environments.
  • Choose additional coursework from the Anthropology, Economics, and Psychology disciplines, or POSC 204 American Government.

*The six semester hours must come from at least two different disciplines

Arts and Humanities (6 hours)

A minimum of 6 hours of Arts and Humanities coursework is required.  Choose from the Art, English Literature, Fine Arts, Humanities, Music, Philosophy, Religion or Theater disciplines.

Additional General Education Requirements (12 hours)
UNI 199 - University Seminar (2)
A mandatory course for entering full-time, degree-candidate students at Urbana. This course is designed to help freshmen adjust to the Urbana University and develop strategies for success by providing a "support group" during this critical period of adjustment and examining problems common to the freshman experience. Students must pass the course or be required to repeat it.
PF 116 - Computer Applications (3)
A course designed to acquaint students with the computer and its capabilities as they relate to business situations. Students will learn computer basics and how to use the computer for various applications including word processing, spreadsheets, internet usage, and presentation software.
COMM 150 - Interpersonal Communication (4)
By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking.
OR SPCH 100 - Speech Communication (4)
This public-speaking course emphasizes the fundamentals of extemporaneous speaking. Skill-building activities and assignments focus on research, organization, reasoning, style and delivery of presentations as well as listening and audience engagement.
ENG 220 - Research Writing: Exploring Professional (4)
This is an intermediate course focusing on the composition of research papers. Students in this course prepare to be active participants in professional discourse communities by examining and practicing the writing conventions associated with their own fields of study and work. By calling attention to the conventions of disciplinary writing, the course also prepares students for upper-division college writing and the special conventions of advanced academic discourse. Course activities include three extended research papers, semi-formal writing addressing interdisciplinary communication, and readings fostering critical engagement with disciplinary conversations.

General Education Elective (1)

Major Area (64 hours)
BSAD 110 - Business Principles (4)
An introductory business course that helps students learn business terminology and provides preliminary study into the areas of economics, global business, ethics, business ownership, business management, human resource management, marketing, accounting and finance.
ENG 205 - Business & Professional Writing (4)
This is an intermediate composition course focusing on writing for business and professional purposes. Students will review the writing conventions commonly expected within business and professional environments, as well as strategies for analyzing rhetorical situations within those environments. Coursework includes analysis, revision, and research exercises, as well as substantial practice in composing business correspondence. The final project is an extensive, researched business proposal developed in stages and presented to the class. Students will be encouraged to relate course materials to their major programs and workplace experiences.
EXS 140 - Foundations/Principles/History Sport (3)
Students become familiar with the nature, scope, history and philosophy of physical education; changing concepts of physical education; and scientific foundation of physical education.
EXS 203 - Sport and Society (3)
Designed to look at sport and its role in society and the influence of society on sport in the areas of preparation for life, deviance in sports, coach's role, gender, race and ethnicity, class relations and social mobility, sports and the economy, sports and the media, sports and politics, sports and religion.
EXS 204 - Intro to Sports and Exercise Psychology (3)
This course introduces students to sports and exercise psychology theories, research, and selected applications of those theories and research. Topics include, but are not limited to, motivation, team dynamics, improving performance, and challenges/transitions in sport. Students will also learn how to apply sports psychology concepts to professional, personal, and social contexts.
EXS 423 - Organization/Admin of Sports Programs (3)
Covers the changing nature of administration of health, physical education, and recreation programs; administrative relationships, administrative setting; physical plant; purchase and care of supplies and equipment; legal liability; insurance management; and professional and public relations.
HEA 152 - Wellness (3)
This course is designed to assist students when making intelligent decisions throughout life in order to achieve an optimal level of wellness. Emphasis will be placed on the wellness concept and its relationship to fitness, nutrition, self-esteem, and stress management. The areas of catastrophic diseases, aging process, and medical consumerism will be covered.
HRM 300 - Human Resources Management (4)
An introduction to the human resources function and related elements and activities. The course outlines the roles and functions of members of the human resources department, as well as educating others outside human resources, in how their roles include human resources-related activities. The student will learn about the evolution in human resources management as we know it today. Emphasis is placed on the modern day importance of HRM and the new "corporate view" of the function. Additionally, the student will be exposed to the view of HRM from the perception of both management and subordinate employees. The importance of maintaining fair and equitable compensation and benefit programs will be discussed. The student will be exposed to practical situations and problem solving regarding areas of employee counseling, discipline and termination. Equal Employment Opportunity will be discussed in order for the student to understand its need, importance and the legal issues surrounding it. Other critical areas of training and development, staffing and strategy will also be explored.
SOCL 335 - Applied Research Methods (4)
Applied Research Methods introduces students to foundational issues of social scientific research - that is, research entailing the application of the scientific method to the study of human behavior. Students will examine the strengths and weaknesses of major quantitative and qualitative data collection techniques as well as the processes involved in planning and executing such projects and the standards of evaluating the quality of data.
SPM 207 - Principles of Sport Management (3)
This course provides an introduction to the sports management field including career opportunities. Topics covered include knowledge and skills related to planning, organizing, directing, controlling, budgeting, and leading a sports related organization.
SPM 300 - Coaching Methodologies I (3)
This course is a comprehensive introduction to the coaching profession. Emphasis is placed on sport at the high school and various club levels. Consideration is also given to coaching at other levels, such as youth, recreational, and intercollegiate sports programs. The primary goal of the course is to develop and enhance students' knowledge and understanding of concepts and techniques of coaching and their application to achieving important objectives in working with athletes. The course and textbook combine sport science theory and research with the practical knowledge and methods of expert coaches in the five essential categories of coaching education and professional practice.
SPM 306 - Sports Marketing (3)
Through this course, students will gain an understanding of the special nature of the sports market. The course includes a combination of knowledge and skills related to the promotion, selling, and advertising of services and/or products within sports and physical activity industries.
SPM 310 - Coaching Methodologies II (3)
This course will explore the principles and procedures necessary to establish a sport club organization. An emphasis will be placed on creating a sport club business plan, and constructing a mini-grant proposal. Students who learn this information will be enabled to develop, manage, and sustain highly organized, professional, and structured clubs.
SPM 320 - Sports Information (3)
This course provides the student with the variety of media in which to disseminate sports Information. It explores ethical, legal, and social issues relating to the sports information field.
SPM 351 - Sports Law (3)
This course provides information into the legal issues related to the sports field. Topics will cover the time frame from amateur through professional sports. Basic legal principles affecting the management of recreation and sports programs, liability and risk assessment of those programs will be covered.
SPM 430 - Sports Industry (3)
This course will provide a more detailed discussion of sport promotion and sales management. Students will gain an understanding or sponsorships, licensing, global issues, and after-marketing techniques that confront the modern-day sports promoter.
SPM 450 - Managing Athletic Programs (3)
This course provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to manage athletic programs in schools, colleges, community centers, and other venues. It explores ethical, legal, and social issues relating to following the various standards such as NCAA, NAIA, OHSAA, and others. The course will also explore such areas as specific organizational management and structures, communication techniques, insurance and transportation issues.
SPM 470 - Leadership in Sport (3)
This course will examine the role and responsibility of leadership in the area of sports. An emphasis will be placed on leadership styles, techniques, leadership's role in management, and issues and problems in leading people in sports.
SPM 491 - Field Experience Sport Management (1-6)
This course provides the student with a sustained field experience in the area of sports management and their chosen emphasis of study. The student supplements theoretical classroom knowledge with practical on-the-job experience. Students receive close supervision and comprehensive evaluation for credit purposes by employers and university personnel. It is possible to receive a salary while doing field experience, depending upon placement opportunities.
University Electives (20 hours)

Any undergraduate courses offered by the University except developmental education courses.

Additional Requirements

All students are required to pass College Writing (ENG 120), and University Seminar (UNI 199) prior to enrolling in any course at the 200 level or above. Interpersonal Communication (COMM 150) or Speech Communication (SPCH 100) must be taken prior to enrolling in any course at the 300 level or above. Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement. Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement.

Careers

Shoot to Score With UU’s Sport Management Program

Sport managers need to understand the social, economic, political and legal issues that control the changing practices and development of the industry. You’ll explore connections between sports, exercise and human behavior and learn about leadership, coaching and managing athletic programs.

Urbana’s Sport Management degree prepares you for leadership, supervisory and administrative positions in corporate wellness, commercial and community-based sports, recreational and fitness arenas. This action-packed major prepares you to compete for positions as agents, scouts, managers, publicists, promoters, fundraisers, sports franchise managers and athletic directors.

Program Outcomes

  1. Graduates will be able to identify the disciplines and sub-disciplines within the sport management industry.

  2. Graduates will be able to describe customer-centric principles and apply them to the sport setting.

  3. Graduates will be able to demonstrate critical thinking to sport management challenges that exist within public and private sector, for-profit and not-for-profit sector, and educational sport settings.

  4. Graduates will able to explain the principle concepts, theories, practices, and styles of leadership in sport.

  5. Graduates will be able to demonstrate applied sport management principles to scenario based and practical settings.

  6. Graduates will be able to recognize and describe theories of human behaviors in the coaching, exercise and sport settings.

Undergraduate Studies Admission Requirements

Each applicant seeking admission to Urbana University is individually evaluated. Factors considered are past academic achievement, aptitude, extracurricular activities, and any additional evidence supporting the prospect of academic success.

To qualify for admission, applicants seeking an associate or bachelor's degree must present evidence of high school completion in the form of a high school diploma or GED. Careful consideration is given to the applicants academic record to include the curriculum, courses, and/or state mandated graduation tests. Results from standardized testing (either ACT or SAT) are required for first-time freshmen. Students who wish to apply for admission, but do not meet the minimum standardized test scores used for placement in University courses may be required to undergo placement testing.

Undergraduate admission requirements and materials:

A student who meets at least one of the following criteria is eligible for admission as a degree-seeking student:

  • Has provided official documentation of graduation from an accredited high school or its equivalent (see documentation required below), or
  • Has an associate, bachelor or master's degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher education, an institution recognized as a candidate for accreditation, or an institution recognized by the Council of Higher Education Accreditation

Documentation required:

1. Documentation of high school graduation or equivalence is required for applicants who are transferring fewer than 24 semester hours that apply towards a degree.

2. If the student has transferable hours of 24 credit hours or more from a regionally accredited institution of higher education, then they will not have to provide a high school diploma or equivalence. Acceptable forms of documentation of high school graduation or high school equivalence for undergraduate admission must include one of the following:

  • Official high school transcript listing the date of graduation
  • Official GED certificate
  • Official documentation of having passed a State High School Equivalency examination
  • Official documentation of a home school completion certificate/transcript
  • Official transcripts from all educational institutions (college, universities, professional schools, etc.) attended

3. Any applicant seeking to be a first-time freshman undergraduate degree-seeking students at Urbana University must supply standardized test scores (ACT SAT) to be used for placement in courses., to determine athletic eligibility, and/or determine institutional scholarship qualification.

At any time the University may require an applicant to meet with the Admissions Committee to address questions that arise in the application review process. If an applicant requests transfer credit, official transcripts from any other regionally accredited institution are required.

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