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Cybersecurity

Protect Data and Systems with a Cybersecurity Major

We see it in the movies; hackers breach security lines and significant amounts of data are compromised. People are stealing money, identities and private information. What once was a Hollywood exaggeration has now become a leading issue in our technology-driven world. Because of this, cybersecurity is a booming field, and the industry needs educated individuals protecting our data.

Cybersecurity provides protection to information and prevents manipulation, modification or loss of data. In the Forbes article, “What it Means to Have a Culture of Cybersecurity,” it says, “Every 40 seconds a business falls victim to a ransomware attack.” Students who graduate with a Cybersecurity major from Urbana will learn layered security architecture and prevention techniques for technological invasions, keeping our information, and our world, safe from cyber-attacks.

Lead the Industry with a Multidisciplinary Education

Urbana’s Bachelor of Science in Cybersecurity degree program exposes students to classes in technology, policy, architecture and management. These courses pair with programming, risk assessment and vulnerability scanning to teach students industry-standard cybersecurity methodologies. Students will also interact with local businesses where they will analyze the needs of the business, perform data analysis and develop plans to mitigate security risks. 

Pair a B.S. in Cybersecurity with an Information Systems or Information Technology degree to fully encapsulate the progress of technology, and become a significant figure in its growth. 

Curriculum & Course Descriptions

124 Semester Hours
Fundamental General Education Core (24 hours)
English Composition (3 hours)

Choose a minimum of 3 semester hours from:

ENG 120 - College Writing (4)
In this course, students acquire the writing competence necessary for conducting and presenting research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all of their courses. The course also emphasizes the elements of good writing style, appropriate grammar and mechanics, clarity of language, and logical and cohesive development. It culminates in submission of a documented research paper.
Mathematics (3 hours)
MATH 160 - College Algebra (4)
This course is designed to prepare students for Applied Calculus and Discrete Mathematics and to provide the mathematical background needed for the analytic reasoning used in other courses. Topics include functions and their graphs, including exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; basic principles of counting and probability; and other selected topics.

Choose MATH 150 Fundamental Algebra as the prerequisite. Course can count as a University elective.

Sciences (6 hours)

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from the Science discipline.

One must have a laboratory component.

Social and Behavioral Sciences (6 hours)

A minimum of 6 hours of Social & Behavioral Sciences coursework is required.  Choose from Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology.  Must select at least two different disciplines to meet requirements.

Arts and Humanities (6 hours)
HUMN 211 - Intro to Ethical Analysis & Reasoning (2)
The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior' Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not' Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides' Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment' Are people always responsible for their actions' Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil' both' neither' Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places'

Choose additional course from the Art, English Literature, Fine Arts, Humanities, Music, Philosophy, Religion or Theater disciplines.

Additional General Education Requirements (14 hours)
UNI 199 - University Seminar (2)
A mandatory course for entering full-time, degree-candidate students at Urbana. This course is designed to help freshmen adjust to the Urbana University and develop strategies for success by providing a "support group" during this critical period of adjustment and examining problems common to the freshman experience. Students must pass the course or be required to repeat it.
COMM 150 - Interpersonal Communication (4)
By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking.
OR SPCH 100 - Speech Communication (4)
This public-speaking course emphasizes the fundamentals of extemporaneous speaking. Skill-building activities and assignments focus on research, organization, reasoning, style and delivery of presentations as well as listening and audience engagement.
ENG 220 - Research Writing: Exploring Professional (4)
This is an intermediate course focusing on the composition of research papers. Students in this course prepare to be active participants in professional discourse communities by examining and practicing the writing conventions associated with their own fields of study and work. By calling attention to the conventions of disciplinary writing, the course also prepares students for upper-division college writing and the special conventions of advanced academic discourse. Course activities include three extended research papers, semi-formal writing addressing interdisciplinary communication, and readings fostering critical engagement with disciplinary conversations.
MATH 280 - Intro to Probability & Statistics (4)
This course is designed to serve students in the Computer and Information Sciences majors. The topics covered are descriptive statistics in numerical & graphical methods, probability concepts, discrete and continuous probability distributions, estimation theory, hypothesis testing, simple linear regression and correlation, and linear programming. These topics will be taught with a rigorous Algebra content and using a statistical software such as Minitab.
Professional Core (24 hours)
COMP 101 - Problem Solving With Computing (2)
Many organizations today utilize computers and information systems to store, organize, analyze, and summarize data to solve problems. As a result, computing is a tool that can benefit students in many different fields. At the heart of solving problems with computers is the study of structured thinking using algorithms. This course is designed for students with no prior programming experience and teaches the building blocks of algorithms, including variables, expressions, selection and repetition structures, functions and parameters, and array processing.
COMP 204 - Principles of Computer Networks (2)
This course serves as an introduction to the function, design, administration, and implementation of computer networks. Topics include network infrastructure, architecture, protocols, applications, and the OSI networking model.
COMP 281 - Database Management Systems (4)
This course covers fundamental concepts necessary for the design, use, implementation and administration of database systems. The course will stress the fundamentals of database modeling and design, the languages and facilities provided by database management systems, and some techniques for implementing and administering database systems.
ISEC 200 - Cyber Security Fundamentals (2)
The Internet has changed dramatically; so have the activities that are dependent on it in some shape or form. Understanding the need for security, it's influence on people, businesses and society, as well as business drivers is critical. The course also covers malicious attacks, threats and vulnerabilities common to the world of security, as well as access controls, and methods to assess and respond to risks. Hands-on labs accompany the various concepts that are taught.
ISEC 325 - Communication & Network Security (4)
Networks are the major point of entry to most computer systems. Preventing unwanted intrusion, use, abuse, or flooding of communications channels is a high priority to organizations trying to protect their assets. Network security is about preserving the appropriate use of network resources while preventing disallowed use. In this course, you will learn how to employ firewalls, VPNs, and stateful packet inspection techniques to harden computer networks. Topics include packet filtering, intrusion detection and prevention, ingress and egress rules, monitoring, network access controls, authentication, authorization, and auditing.
ITEC 136 - Principles of Programming (4)
This course covers fundamental programming principles for individuals with at least some programming background. Major themes are structured programming, problem solving, algorithm design, top-down stepwise refinement, and software lifecycle. Topics will include testing, data types, operators, repetition and selection control structures, functions, arrays, and objects. Students will design, code, test, debug, and document programs in a relevant programming language.
MIS 200 - Management Information Systems (4)
The purpose of this course is to provide the fundamentals associated with the management of information technology in a business enterprise. These fundamentals are business concepts in which the influence of information technology has caused change or brought about new concepts. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding the managerial issues that are relevant to usage of computers. The student will be given problems isolating these issues and will be asked to propose solutions with alternatives.
WEBD 101 - Introduction to Web Page Construction (2)
This course covers the fundamental concepts necessary for the construction of web pages using the basic building blocks of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (css). HTML and XHTML are covered in detail for building web pages using a web page development environment. The use of styling using css is introduced.
University Electives (26 hours)

Any undergraduate courses offered by the University except developmental education courses.

Major Area (36 hours)
ISEC 300 - Information Assurance (4)
In a highly connected, data intensive, and cost-focused business environment, the practice of information security not a business advantage; it is a customer requirement. Viruses, malware, trojans, denial of service attacks, phishing, and even Wiki leaks have become headline news. Failure to insure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data costs companies millions, if not billions of dollars in legal settlements, lost business, and trade secrets. In this breadth-based course, you will get an overview of information security principles and practices, including security models, risk management, access controls, intrusion detection and prevention, cryptography, software vulnerabilities, and ethical issues. Subsequent courses expand on this foundational material in much greater depth.
ISEC 350 - Security Risk Management (4)
Proper assessment, management, and mitigation of risk are essential to any information security strategy. Risks aren't just related to IT assets, but to the overall business that the IT organization is supporting, thus, business continuity planning and impact analysis is also important. In this course, you will learn how to identify and analyze risks, determine impacts, and develop plans to mitigate issues. Topics include threats, vulnerabilities, exploits, and countermeasures; US compliance laws; risk assessment and mitigation; business impact analysis; and business continuity and disaster recovery planning.
ISEC 375 - Digital Forensics & Incident Response (4)
The prevalence of data breaches, identity theft, and the dark net today makes the study of digital forensics and cybercrime highly relevant to information security. Identifying, acquiring, preserving, analyzing and reporting evidence to business and law enforcement is a much-needed skill. This course will cover those topics as well as the live versus dead-box techniques, appropriate legal and regulatory issues, open source and commercial tools, and the special challenges represented by new and emerging technologies.
ISEC 400 - Software Development Security (4)
Software vulnerabilities, especially those that compromise personal or financial data, are appallingly common. Nearly every major software company has needed to deal with the fallout of a major incident due to vulnerabilities in their products. Writing correct - let alone secure - software is very difficult. Yet users and executives expect it. In this course, you will learn about the typical development mistakes that lead to application-level security issues as well as how to defend against them. Students will explore the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) top 10 security vulnerabilities. Topics include unchecked user input, injection, fuzzing, CSRF, XSS, cryptography, CAPTCHA, configuration errors, authentication, and authorization.
ISEC 475 - Security Engineering & Assessment (4)
Ensuring the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of large and complex systems is notoriously difficult in the face of capable and determined opponents. This course discusses security engineering as the practical application of requirements analysis, modeling, architecture, processes, and measurement toward improving the dependability of complex information systems throughout their lifecycle.
ISEC 495 - Cyber Security Capstone (4)
The Information Security Capstone course encourages teamwork in small groups on a substantial project. The intent of this course is to provide a capstone experience that integrates the material contained in courses required of the information security major. It also provides an opportunity for students to recognize and evaluate the interrelationship of their general education courses with the courses taken for their information security major. The major areas of the program are reviewed and assessed via standardized exams. Students will also culminate their experiences with an overview of the evolution of computer systems and a look at the near-term future.
ITEC 350 - Windows Administration (4)
This course provides the student with an introduction to Windows Server 2008 administration and is structured to assist a network manager or planner in planning, configuring, installing, running, and repairing networks that include a Windows Server 2008. As such, it provides an introduction to server installation, Active Directory, printer management, domains, network clients, security, disaster recovery, fault/error management, and scripting of common tasks. This course also uses virtualization software to isolate the Windows Server 2008 operating system from the underlying host operating system. As such, administrative access to a fast machine running Windows XP or better with at least 2 gigabytes of memory and 40 gigabytes of available hard drive space is required. For face to face classes, an external USB 2.0 hard drive with at least 40 gigabytes of free space is required to bring to class.
MIS 310 - Info Systems Architecture & Technology (4)
This course provides a conceptual survey of general systems theory followed by a conceptual and technological survey of the structure of distributed information systems architectures, operating systems, network operating systems, peripheral technology and user interfaces. Interoperability between these architectural components will be explored and current technology and trends in each architectural element will be reviewed. This course will de-emphasize, although not ignore, mainframe architectures in favor of information architectures more applicable to client/server computing. The various interacting categories of client/server computing as well as the benefits and implications of such a system will be fully explored.
WEBD 236 - Web Information Systems Programming (4)
This course builds web applications by employing server-side scripts that query relational databases. The student learns and reflects on two- and three-tier software architectures, separation of responsibility, model-view-controller pattern, basic security, and web frameworks. The student will design, code, test, debug, and document programs using a server-based scripting language. Note: This is a technology course in a technology program, and it requires the purchase of software that may be used in subsequent courses as well as being suitable for commercial work beyond completion of degree studies. For specific software requirements, consult the course syllabus.
Additional Requirements

All students are required to pass College Writing (ENG 120), and University Seminar (UNI 199) prior to enrolling in any course at the 200 level or above. Interpersonal Communication (COMM 150) or Speech Communication (SPCH 100) must be taken prior to enrolling in any course at the 300 level or above. Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement. Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement.

Professionally Relevant

National CyberWatch Center

Through Urbana University's Center for Public Safety and Cybersecurity Education, a member of the National CyberWatch Center, the branch campus collaboratively engages in efforts to advance cybersecurity education and strengthen the nation’s cybersecurity workforce. In service to communities and individuals, we provide access to the latest research impacting the industry, as well as innovations in cybersecurity education and training.

Center for Public Safety and Cybersecurity Education

Urbana University’s Center for Public Safety and Cybersecurity Education provides the skills necessary to prepare professionals to effectively prevent, solve and investigate cybersecurity issues and challenges. The Center’s offerings leverage its faculty – who are both thought leaders and practitioners – along with our reputation for excellence in curriculum and course development to create learning experiences that address prevailing security concerns within industries and communities.
 

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Careers

Hack Your Way to Next-Level Career Opportunities 

The field of Cybersecurity offers a wide variety of career paths in business and government. Protect valuable data from security threats or hackers by becoming an expert in security programs, or build your own. Employment opportunities include application security tester; network security specialist; cyber threat and security analyst or engineer; security architect or administrator; cybersecurity analyst and more.

Undergraduate Studies Admission Requirements

Each applicant seeking admission to Urbana University is individually evaluated. Factors considered are past academic achievement, aptitude, extracurricular activities, and any additional evidence supporting the prospect of academic success.

To qualify for admission, applicants seeking an associate or bachelor's degree must present evidence of high school completion in the form of a high school diploma or GED. Careful consideration is given to the applicants academic record to include the curriculum, courses, and/or state mandated graduation tests. Results from standardized testing (either ACT or SAT) are required for first-time freshmen. Students who wish to apply for admission, but do not meet the minimum standardized test scores used for placement in University courses may be required to undergo placement testing.

Undergraduate admission requirements and materials:

A student who meets at least one of the following criteria is eligible for admission as a degree-seeking student:

  • Has provided official documentation of graduation from an accredited high school or its equivalent (see documentation required below), or
  • Has an associate, bachelor or master's degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher education, an institution recognized as a candidate for accreditation, or an institution recognized by the Council of Higher Education Accreditation

Documentation required:

1. Documentation of high school graduation or equivalence is required for applicants who are transferring fewer than 24 semester hours that apply towards a degree.

2. If the student has transferable hours of 24 credit hours or more from a regionally accredited institution of higher education, then they will not have to provide a high school diploma or equivalence. Acceptable forms of documentation of high school graduation or high school equivalence for undergraduate admission must include one of the following:

  • Official high school transcript listing the date of graduation
  • Official GED certificate
  • Official documentation of having passed a State High School Equivalency examination
  • Official documentation of a home school completion certificate/transcript
  • Official transcripts from all educational institutions (college, universities, professional schools, etc.) attended

3. Any applicant seeking to be a first-time freshman undergraduate degree-seeking students at Urbana University must supply standardized test scores (ACT SAT) to be used for placement in courses., to determine athletic eligibility, and/or determine institutional scholarship qualification.

At any time the University may require an applicant to meet with the Admissions Committee to address questions that arise in the application review process. If an applicant requests transfer credit, official transcripts from any other regionally accredited institution are required.

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