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Liberal Studies

Choose Liberal Studies Now for a Range of Options Later

Liberal studies is the study of the key humanities – including science, math, history and more. Liberal studies takes higher-education fundamentals into account and goes in-depth on aspects of contemporary American life – giving you a well-rounded education with endless possibilities.

Studies show that Millennials may have more than 15 different jobs over the course of their working lives. As a communication studies major, you’ll develop skills you can use in any field of interest. Our broadly experienced faculty will teach you to think critically, write clearly and persuasively, and analyze data and information to better solve problems at work and in life.

Focus Your Degree on Your Future

No one knows what the future holds, but in the meantime, you know where your passions lie. By tailoring your communication studies major to your interests and career goals, you will set yourself up for success. Enhance your liberal studies major with a specialization in Communications (Mass Media track or Performing Arts track), English, History, Political Science or Sociology.

Choose a specialization:

Curriculum & Course Descriptions

120 Semester Hours
Fundamental General Education Core (24 hours)
English Composition (3 hours)

Choose a minimum of 3 semester hours from:

ENG 120 - College Writing (4)
In this course, students acquire the writing competence necessary for conducting and presenting research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all of their courses. The course also emphasizes the elements of good writing style, appropriate grammar and mechanics, clarity of language, and logical and cohesive development. It culminates in submission of a documented research paper.
Mathematics (3 hours)

Select:

MATH 215 - Statistical Concepts (4)
This course introduces the student to statistics with business applications. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; graphical displays of data; linear regression; basic probability concepts; binomial and normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. These topics will be covered using a basic knowledge of algebra and Microsoft Excel.

*Choose either MATH 140 Introduction to Quantitative Reasoning or MATH 150 Fundamental Algebra as the prerequisite to MATH 215. Course can count as a University Elective.

Sciences (6 hours)

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from the Science discipline.

One must have a laboratory component.

Social and Behavioral Sciences (6 hours)

Select:

ANTH 215 - Cultural Anthropology (4)
This course exposes students to the principles, concepts, research methods, and applications of cultural anthropology. Students will be introduced to the wide range of variation in social and institutional arrangements found historically and cross-culturally. From language to gender roles, from bases of social stratification to causes and consequences of conformity, from the simpler life in foraging societies to the seeming-chaos in modern post-industrial societies: students will examine the enormous variation in solutions to the requisites of social life.

Choose an additional course from the Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology or Sociology discipline. The six semester hours must come from at least two different disciplines.

Arts and Humanities (6 hours)

Select:

HUMN 240 - Popular Culture (4)
An introductory course that examines basic concepts in popular culture studies and the role popular arts and artifacts play in shaping cultural values. The course covers basic theories and approaches to topics like best sellers, popular music, popular art forms, cultural heroes from the sports and entertainment worlds and other popular phenomena.

Also choose one additional course from the Art, English Literature, Fine Arts, Music, Philosophy, Religion, or Theater disciplines.

Additional General Education Requirements (12 hours)
UNI 199 - University Seminar (2)
A mandatory course for entering full-time, degree-candidate students at Urbana. This course is designed to help freshmen adjust to the Urbana University and develop strategies for success by providing a "support group" during this critical period of adjustment and examining problems common to the freshman experience. Students must pass the course or be required to repeat it.
PF 116 - Computer Applications (3)
A course designed to acquaint students with the computer and its capabilities as they relate to business situations. Students will learn computer basics and how to use the computer for various applications including word processing, spreadsheets, internet usage, and presentation software.
COMM 150 - Interpersonal Communication (4)
By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking.
OR SPCH 100 - Speech Communication (4)
This public-speaking course emphasizes the fundamentals of extemporaneous speaking. Skill-building activities and assignments focus on research, organization, reasoning, style and delivery of presentations as well as listening and audience engagement.
ENG 220 - Research Writing: Exploring Professional (4)
This is an intermediate course focusing on the composition of research papers. Students in this course prepare to be active participants in professional discourse communities by examining and practicing the writing conventions associated with their own fields of study and work. By calling attention to the conventions of disciplinary writing, the course also prepares students for upper-division college writing and the special conventions of advanced academic discourse. Course activities include three extended research papers, semi-formal writing addressing interdisciplinary communication, and readings fostering critical engagement with disciplinary conversations.
Core Courses
Arts and Humanities

Choose two courses from the following:

ART 211 - Art Appreciation - Ancient Art (3)
An appreciation of the visual arts based on discussing what is conveyed by specific works of art and how each artist communicated to his or her audience. Artistic traditions covered in the course are Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Medieval, and Renaissance.
ART 212 - Art Appreciation - Modern Art (3)
An appreciation of the modern tradition in the visual arts based on an examination of what artists of the 19th and 20th centuries have chosen to say and how they have chosen to say it.
ENG 232 - Introduction to Literature (4)
In this course, students will analyze works from the three major literary genres: poetry, drama, and fiction. Students will become familiar with standard vocabulary and approaches specific to the field of literary criticism and consider the importance of literature in contemporary society. The goal of this course is to encourage students to read for pleasure (engage with the text on an emotional level) while also moving towards a more objective consideration of literature by introducing the fundamentals of close reading and literary analysis.
ENG 360 - Introduction to Creative Writing (4)
This course introduces the student to the world of creative writing, presenting the power of the written word, cultivating the individual's style in interpreting and writing poetry, fiction, and non-fiction, as well as drama. Participants will create a portfolio of work, mastering techniques employed by studied authors. Students also will learn strategies for generating ideas, becoming members of a community of writers who encourage and critique one another's craft by participating in writing workshops.
HUMN 246 - Film Appreciation (4)
This course is an introduction to the art of film intended to enable students to become more knowledgeable, appreciative and critical viewers. The course covers the major areas of film: narrative, documentary, animated and experimental. While some film history is covered, this course emphasizes understanding key elements in the filmmaking process: scripting, filming, editing, acting, directing, promoting and distributing. Students will be required to view and write critical reviews of films screened both in and out of class.
HUMN 295 - Film, Television & Media History (4)
In this course students will learn to evaluate historical mediated content for not only its impact on current content but also to explore how our current cultural, political, social, artistic and mediated society is shaped by its historical underpinnings. This course serves as an introduction to the historical evolution of film, television, and other media content as well as an overview of the broader contexts and implications these media have on history. Students will also study the analytic techniques available for making sense of, appreciating, and taking issue with various media as understood in their proper cultural and historical contexts.
MUS 205 - Music Appreciation (3)
A survey of the history and development of music in Western civilization. Important composers, forms, and styles will be studied and placed in historical perspective.
THE 100 - Introduction to Theatre (3)
Basic survey of contemporary theatrical theory and practice. This course is designed to introduce students to the art of the theatre and to encourage an appreciation for theatre as an art and as an integral element of culture. Topics will include theatre artists and their processes, types of productions, genres of drama and representative dramatists, and theatrical criticism.
Social and Behavioral Sciences

Choose a Psychology or Sociology course from the 200-level or above.

COMM 202 - Introduction to Mass Media (3)
In this course students learn how to critically engage and make sense of the media around us and become media literate consumers who are knowledgeable and self-critical of mass media content. In addition to introducing students to the use of media, in both contemporary and historical contexts, this course will help students develop the analytical tools that they can use to examine media content, intent, context, and subtext in order to explore what and how we learn from the media, and how media shape our perceptions in regard to race/ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality, geography, and education as well as how media operate and exert their influence on individuals and society.
HIST 221 - World Civilization I: Prehistory-1500 (3)
A survey of the major historical periods in civilization from early beginnings to circa 1500 A.D. Students will gain perspectives of world civilization in addition to Western cultural focuses. This survey will integrate art, philosophy, science, and history into meaningful themes.
OR HIST 222 - World Civilization II: 1400-Present (3)
A survey of the major historical periods in civilization from circa 1500 A.D. to the present. Students will gain perspectives of world civilization in addition to Western cultural focuses. This survey will integrate art, philosophy, science, and history into meaningful themes.
HIST 341 - United States Social & Cultural History (3)
An exploration of the development of the social and cultural history of the United States from the colonial period to today. Emphasis is placed upon the United States' diverse peoples and the cultural forces that shaped their daily lives. Special attention will be given to: Native American, African Americans, Reform Movements, Popular Culture, with emphasis on race, class, gender, ethnicity, technology, environment, industrialization, urbanization, immigration, migration and wars.
OR HIST 351 - United States Women's History (3)
An exploration of United States History from colonial to the present using the history of women and gender as the primary analysis. Emphasis is placed on women's history, incorporating factors of race, class, region, ethnicity, and age, but also tracing how the changing definitions of gender for both males and females has affected general historical trends. Sophomore, Junior, or Senior status required.
COMM 315 - Communication Ethics (4)
This course examines the strategies involved in effective, ethical communication in professional contexts. Students examine principles of ethical organizational communication and the temporal/cultural/social forces behind those principles, as well as apply reasoning and critical thinking in individual and group assignments. Comparing values and perspectives from diverse cultures, students will respond to cases in an intercultural professional environment.
OR PHIL 208 - Ethics (3)
An introductory course in philosophy, with special emphasis on the classical alternative views of ethics and on their application to issues faced in everyday life. Some of these issues are the morality of war, euthanasia, behavior control, sexual morality, and morality in the business world.
PHIL 300 - Logic and Rhetoric (3)
An introduction to logic, designed to aid students in developing ways to distinguish correct from incorrect reasoning. Methods of critically evaluating arguments are considered. The course provides a methodological foundation for further study in philosophy, communications, the natural sciences, and the social sciences.
POSC 200 - Principles of Political Science (3)
An introduction to political theory, the basic concepts and terminology of the discipline with an analysis of power, conflict and its resolution, political institutions, and the decision-making process.
PSYC 110 - General Psychology (4)
A survey of the various fields of study comprising modern scientific psychology. The course examines the theories, research findings, and applications in each of the major areas of psychology, with the goal of providing students with practice information they can apply to their personal and professional lives. The topic areas covered in the course include learning and memory, motivation and emotion, human development, theories of personality, psychopathology, and social behavior.
OR SOCL 110 - Introduction to Sociology (4)
Sociology is the scientific study of group behavior - whether the groups are dyads, small groups, associations, bureaucracies, societies, publics, aggregates, social movements, or mobs, etc. This introductory course introduces the student to sociological principles and theoretical perspectives that facilitate understanding the norms, values, structure and process of the various types of groups into which people organize. The course focuses on applying the scientific method to studying social problems (e.g. poverty, crime, sexism and racism) and basic institutions (i.e. family, government, economy, religion, education). Students will develop their "sociological imagination" as a way of understanding what their lives are and can be in relation to the larger social forces at work in local, national, and international environments.
Sociology Specialization
Sociology (12 hours)

Choose 12 hours of Sociology Courses.

Psychology (6 hours)

Choose 6 hours of Psychology Courses at the 300 level or above.

Political Science Specialization

Choose 15 hours of Political Science courses.  At least 12 hours must be at the 300 level or above.

POSC 495 - Seminar Capstone in Political Science (1-3)
The student works independently under the supervision of his/her faculty advisor. The course will assess the student's entire undergraduate program and offer advice for improvement and/or synthesize knowledge from previous courses. The course will include presentations and/or individual research to the advisor and/or other faculty or students.
Media & Communication Specialization

Take all Media & Communication required courses.  Select one specialization from Communication Generalist, Performing Arts, or Media Studies & Production.

Specialization Requirements (19 hours)
GRPH 117 - Graphic Editing Software (1)
This course provides students with advanced instruction in graphic editing software. Projects will use tools, layers and filters to edit and create digital images for use in design. Note: Students without access to Franklin University's computer laboratories will be required to obtain software at the student's expense.
COMM 105 - Digital Design (1)
This course starts with principles of good design relevant for print and ends with active learning through the prepress creation of professional communication items like fliers, posters, and brochures. It includes digital prepress techniques and orientation to software used by industry practitioners for layouts. Please note that access to the Adobe Creative Cloud version of InDesign is required for this course.
COMM 205 - Communication Design (1)
Students learn about effective communication through intelligent visual design by creating a tri-fold brochure, a Video-CV, and a professional portfolio using a free webpage builder. All products are customized based on the student's major and professional interests. This hands-on approach to learning message development and communication product design for a range of platforms helps students develop in-demand skills.
COMM 215 - Journalism and Media Writing (3)
In this course, students learn how to write news, editorials, features, scripts, and press releases for various types of traditional and broadcast formats. They also explore the processes associated with the marketing of those endeavors. In addition, the class serves as an introduction to the legal and ethical aspects of what to print/broadcast as well as the historical and contemporary contexts which influence these modern journalism and storytelling approaches.
COMM 301 - Theories of Communication (3)
This course serves as an examination of the theoretical foundations of the communication and media discipline. This includes the major approaches to the study of communication and media from the critical, cultural, and empirical foundations. In addition, students will receive an overview of the historical roots, major theory building perspectives and a review of contemporary theories and applications in the various communication contexts and their application in addressing major issues relevant to communication studies, and media content, audiences and effects.
COMM 321 - Organizational Communication (4)
The course examines the role of communication in organizations. Students will learn the major theories of organizational communication, identifying and defining primary concepts, and applying them to discussions of real-world situations. The role of technology, corporate culture, leadership, teamwork, ethics, and diversity in communication is examined. Effective communication in global organizations and critiques of organization communication systems and structures are also presented.
OR COMM 400 - Intercultural Communication (4)
This course provides an overview of issues, processes, and theories involved with communicating with individuals from different cultures. Topics include thinking and communicating in global contexts and professional relationships in diverse environments.
COMM 421 - Field Experience (3)
A 120-480 clock hour field experience. Students will select placement in a potential career field such as public relations, journalism, or broadcasting. Students pursue the schedule of their placement agency. Three papers unifying theoretical concepts with actual business practice are required.
COMM 490 - Communication Arts Capstone (4)
This course provides the structure needed for students to move from project proposal to project completion, resulting in a final capstone paper and research poster. Students complete independent projects and collaborate in interdisciplinary peer groups that support the development of a research focus and development of academic writing skills.
Communication Generalist (15 hours)
ENG 205 - Business & Professional Writing (4)
This is an intermediate composition course focusing on writing for business and professional purposes. Students will review the writing conventions commonly expected within business and professional environments, as well as strategies for analyzing rhetorical situations within those environments. Coursework includes analysis, revision, and research exercises, as well as substantial practice in composing business correspondence. The final project is an extensive, researched business proposal developed in stages and presented to the class. Students will be encouraged to relate course materials to their major programs and workplace experiences.
PBRL 325 - Public Relations (4)
A general course in the technique of establishing and maintaining public relations. Activities span a variety of media to influence public opinion and manage an organization's reputation.
ENG 370 - Rhetorical Theory & Criticism (3)
In this course, students will examine the rhetorical theorists and theories that have informed current writing and communication practices. Theorists include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, Fish, Burke, Foucault, Kuhn, and Russell.
COMM 321 - Organizational Communication (4)
The course examines the role of communication in organizations. Students will learn the major theories of organizational communication, identifying and defining primary concepts, and applying them to discussions of real-world situations. The role of technology, corporate culture, leadership, teamwork, ethics, and diversity in communication is examined. Effective communication in global organizations and critiques of organization communication systems and structures are also presented.
OR COMM 400 - Intercultural Communication (4)
This course provides an overview of issues, processes, and theories involved with communicating with individuals from different cultures. Topics include thinking and communicating in global contexts and professional relationships in diverse environments.
Performing Arts (12 hours)
THE 102 - Acting (3)
Through vocal and physical exercises, students will acquire a working knowledge and understanding of the techniques and processes involved in the art of acting. The course will focus on warm-ups, relaxation, concentration, sense and memory exploration, self- awareness, and auditioning.
THE 202 - Script Analysis and Character Dvlpment (3)
This course builds on the basic acting exercises learned in THE 102. The student will learn to analyze a role by searching for character traits, physical representations of the character, and techniques for conveying the character to the audience. Work will include the study of both comic and serious modes, and some work on historical periods. Inclass exercises and outside assignments will be required.
THE 204 - Stagecraft (3)
This course is designed to introduce students to the basics of theatrical production including set construction, lighting, properties, costumes, and makeup. The class will explore a variety of stage spaces and their particular requirements as well as materials and equipment. Course includes field trips, guest lectures and projects.
THE 350 - Directing (3)
In this course students learn the basic techniques of theatrical direction. Topics include the role of the modern director, directorial script analysis, basic blocking principles, audition and rehearsal techniques, and directing in different spaces. Structure of the class is a series of projects.
Media Studies & Production (13 hours)
COMM 241 - Media Design (3)
This course teaches the theories and practices associated with visual design principles, and layout for professional communication in traditional and new media formats. The focus of this course is on the creation of media content for use in promotion as well as a cursory overview of the Adobe image and web, creation and editing applications. Specifically, students will learn to utilize PhotoShop, InDesign, and Spark in the completion of these endeavors.
COMM 261 - Video Production (3)
This course focuses on the professional production of video content. Students learn the basics of the production process from start to finish, including writing scripts, lighting, audio, and camera basics as well as the process associated with directing and shooting content. Students also learn to use professional editing software as well as how to deliver their final work for use on television, mobile devices, internet and physical media.
COMM 470 - Media Law (3)
Principles of and case studies in laws regulating print and electronic media, constitutional guarantees, libel, privacy, copyright, privilege, and government regulatory agencies.
PBRL 350 - Media Research & Writing (4)
This course explores approaches and techniques for conducting research and writing within key public relations contexts. Students in this course will examine and utilize research techniques and methodologies that are essential for public relations professionals. Components of this course will include: journalistic research, copywriting, research and writing for broadcast, web research, writing for the Web, transforming technical information for general audiences, and media release writing. Additionally, this course will examine the ethics involved in researching and writing for public relations contexts.
History Specialization

Take all History required courses.  Select one specialization from American History, European History, or Non-Western History.

Specialization Requirements (18 hours)
ENG 370 - Rhetorical Theory & Criticism (3)
In this course, students will examine the rhetorical theorists and theories that have informed current writing and communication practices. Theorists include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, Fish, Burke, Foucault, Kuhn, and Russell.
HIST 201 - United States History I: 1492-1865 (3)
A survey of United States history from its colonial beginnings through the Civil War (1865). The general political, constitutional, social-intellectual, and economic development of the nation will be examined. Special attention will be given to the following topics: Americanization of the colonies, the institution of slavery, emerging nationalism, reform movements, industrialization, continental expansionism, sectionalism, and the Civil War.
OR HIST 202 - US History II: 1866 to Present (3)
A survey of U.S. history from reconstruction (1865) through the present. the general political, constitutional, social-intellectural, and economic development of the modern nation will be examined. Special attention will be given to the following topics: Reconstruction, Industrialization, Progressivism, World Wars and the Great Depression, Cold Wars, Civial Rights, the Vietnam War, changes in the modern economy, the role of the United States in world affairs, and teh late 20th and early 21st centuary presidents.
HIST 350 - Topics in History (3)
This course number includes rotating special topics in history to include current trends in the study of history. Repeatable, provided course content changes.
HUMN 295 - Film, Television & Media History (4)
In this course students will learn to evaluate historical mediated content for not only its impact on current content but also to explore how our current cultural, political, social, artistic and mediated society is shaped by its historical underpinnings. This course serves as an introduction to the historical evolution of film, television, and other media content as well as an overview of the broader contexts and implications these media have on history. Students will also study the analytic techniques available for making sense of, appreciating, and taking issue with various media as understood in their proper cultural and historical contexts.
HIST 421 - Field Experience (1-5)
With the assistance of the supervising faculty member, the student will intern at a community agency that provides historical services, such as a museum, an archives, a preservation laboratory, or an archaeological site. Consideration will be given to matching the student's career goals with his/her placement at an agency. A final paper integrating the student's historical study and historical management theory with actual agency practice is required.
HIST 495 - Senior Seminar in History (1-3)
The student works independently under the supervision of his/her faculty advisor. The course will assess the student's entire undergraduate program and offer advice for improvement and/or synthesize knowledge from previous courses. The course will include presentations and/or individual research to the advisor and/or other faculty or students.
American History (12 hours)
HIST 201 - United States History I: 1492-1865 (3)
A survey of United States history from its colonial beginnings through the Civil War (1865). The general political, constitutional, social-intellectual, and economic development of the nation will be examined. Special attention will be given to the following topics: Americanization of the colonies, the institution of slavery, emerging nationalism, reform movements, industrialization, continental expansionism, sectionalism, and the Civil War.
OR HIST 202 - US History II: 1866 to Present (3)
A survey of U.S. history from reconstruction (1865) through the present. the general political, constitutional, social-intellectural, and economic development of the modern nation will be examined. Special attention will be given to the following topics: Reconstruction, Industrialization, Progressivism, World Wars and the Great Depression, Cold Wars, Civial Rights, the Vietnam War, changes in the modern economy, the role of the United States in world affairs, and teh late 20th and early 21st centuary presidents.
HIST 341 - United States Social & Cultural History (3)
An exploration of the development of the social and cultural history of the United States from the colonial period to today. Emphasis is placed upon the United States' diverse peoples and the cultural forces that shaped their daily lives. Special attention will be given to: Native American, African Americans, Reform Movements, Popular Culture, with emphasis on race, class, gender, ethnicity, technology, environment, industrialization, urbanization, immigration, migration and wars.
OR HIST 351 - United States Women's History (3)
An exploration of United States History from colonial to the present using the history of women and gender as the primary analysis. Emphasis is placed on women's history, incorporating factors of race, class, region, ethnicity, and age, but also tracing how the changing definitions of gender for both males and females has affected general historical trends. Sophomore, Junior, or Senior status required.
POSC 204 - American Government (3)
An overview of the structure and function of the American governmental system, including the roles of the President, Congress, the Supreme Court, the news media, public opinion, and public interest groups in the political system.
POSC 405 - Constitutional Law (3)
This course focuses on those areas of constitutional interpretation involving civil rights and liberties and the powers of government. Theories of constitutional interpretation will be reviewed in conjunction with pivotal cases defining the nature of citizenship and the exercise of governance.
European History (12 hours)
HIST 312 - Medieval Europe (3)
An exploration of the development of civilization during the Middle Ages. Students will read selections relating to artistic, literary, mathematical, musical, philosophical, political, religious and scientific achievements. Students will be encouraged to explore the views of the world expressed by representative figures of the time, to compare these views with their own, and to evaluate the achievements of this age and their influence on modern American society.
OR HIST 314 - Renaissance and Reformation (3)
An exploration of the development of civilization during the Renaissance. Students will read selections relating to artistic, literary, mathematical, musical, philosophical, political, religious, and scientific achievements. Students will be encouraged to explore the views of the world expressed by representative figures of the time, to compare these views with their own, and to evaluate the achievements of this age and their influence on modern American society.
HIST 325 - Modern Imperialism (3)
An examnation of Modern Imperialism from the European expansion in the fifteenth century, through the break up of empires in the tewetieth century, and the emergence of a globalized world. Special attention will be given to the interaction of civilization and cultures outside of Europe. Topics to be addressed will include the issue of European exceptionalism and the rise of the West, the variety of responses to Western expansion, and the arguments over the affects of modern imperialism on the world.
HIST 412 - Twentieth Century Europe (3)
An in-depth study of 20th century European history. The course begins with the causes, events, and settlements of World War I. Major topics in chronological order are as follows: The Bolshevik Revolution and the development and organization of Soviet Russia; the rise of dictatorships in Eastern Europe; the rise of Hitler and Nazi Germany; the Spanish Civil War; the decline of France in the 1930's, causes and events of World War II; post-war settlements and the coming of the Cold War; the development of contemporary Europe.
POSC 305 - Western Political Thought (3)
This course is a survey of political thought in the Western tradition from the ancient Greeks to the postmodern writings of Foucault. Questions to be dealt with include the nature of power, the proper ends of the use of power, the relation of the individual to the community, and the nature of freedom and social justice.
Non-Western History (12 hours)
HIST 221 - World Civilization I: Prehistory-1500 (3)
A survey of the major historical periods in civilization from early beginnings to circa 1500 A.D. Students will gain perspectives of world civilization in addition to Western cultural focuses. This survey will integrate art, philosophy, science, and history into meaningful themes.
OR HIST 222 - World Civilization II: 1400-Present (3)
A survey of the major historical periods in civilization from circa 1500 A.D. to the present. Students will gain perspectives of world civilization in addition to Western cultural focuses. This survey will integrate art, philosophy, science, and history into meaningful themes.
HIST 301 - History of Africa (3)
Examines the history of the continent from earlier time to the present. Considers the political and socioeconomic processes of state formation, technological diffusion, Islam, slavery, colonialism, and current underdevelopment.
HIST 325 - Modern Imperialism (3)
An examnation of Modern Imperialism from the European expansion in the fifteenth century, through the break up of empires in the tewetieth century, and the emergence of a globalized world. Special attention will be given to the interaction of civilization and cultures outside of Europe. Topics to be addressed will include the issue of European exceptionalism and the rise of the West, the variety of responses to Western expansion, and the arguments over the affects of modern imperialism on the world.
POSC 323 - Third World Politics (3)
A review of politics in the Third World including the theoretical perspectives on colonial rule and its legacy, Third World societies and economics, authoritarian and democratic statecraft, the military and politics, culture and politics, great powers and the Third World, and protest and revolution.
English Specialization

Complete the English Core, Literature Core and Writing Core.

English Core (9 hours)
ENG 306 - English Language & Linguistics (3)
A survey of linguistic terminology and pracitice in linguistic analysis, with an historical survey of the history of English from its beginnings in 450 A.D. to modern times. Emphasis will be on morphology, syntax, semantics, and language variation.
ENG 310 - Interpretation and Criticism (3)
Examination of literary critical theory, primarily of the post-World War II era, with an emphasis on reader-response criticism. Students will employ interpretative and critical skills to analyze three major literary works and several shorter works. Assignments will require the use of works of criticism.
ENG 499 - Senior Seminar in English (3)
Capstone course involving an independent research project and an assessment of the student's entire undergraduate program especially of the major. The student will work under the direction of his/her advisor and the project will be evaluated by at least two other faculty members.
Literature Core (9 hours)
ENG 211 - World Literature (3)
Literature from "Gilgamesh" through the 20th century, both Western and non-Western traditions, is included. The course helps students honor real differences among cultures while embracing real bonds that join us a humans even though they are formed over millenniums and traverse continents. Writing is an integral part of the course. Not open to students with credit for ENG 311.
ENG 212 - British Literature (Anglo-Saxon to Ren) (3)
A study of Old and Middle English authors, and early and later Renaissance authors. Emphasis is on major writers and their works, with some coverage of literary history. Not open to students with credit for ENG 312.
OR ENG 213 - British Literature (Augustan-Modern) (3)
A study of Augustan, Neoclassical, Romantic, Victorian, and Modern authors. Emphasis is on major writers and their works, with identification of literary movements, and some coverage of national history. Not open to students with credit for ENG 313.
ENG 209 - American Literature (to the Civil War) (3)
A study of American literary periods from pre-colonial writings about the New World through the Civil War (1865), with emphasis on the contributions of primary writers in exploring themes, characters, and situations common to American literature. As a survey course, ENG 209 is meant to provide a general "road map" to the tradition of American writing, covering both major, well-known writers and minor, less famous voices from the historical and literary past. Not open to students with credit for ENG 309.
OR ENG 210 - American Literature (Civil War-Present) (3)
A study of literary periods beginning with the New Consciousness (1865) to contemporary literature with emphasis on the contributions of primary writers in exploring themes, characters, and situations common to American literature. Not open to students with credit for ENG 310.
Writing Core

Choose 2 ENG courses and 1 COMM course from the following:

ENG 205 - Business & Professional Writing (4)
This is an intermediate composition course focusing on writing for business and professional purposes. Students will review the writing conventions commonly expected within business and professional environments, as well as strategies for analyzing rhetorical situations within those environments. Coursework includes analysis, revision, and research exercises, as well as substantial practice in composing business correspondence. The final project is an extensive, researched business proposal developed in stages and presented to the class. Students will be encouraged to relate course materials to their major programs and workplace experiences.
ENG 220 - Research Writing: Exploring Professional (4)
This is an intermediate course focusing on the composition of research papers. Students in this course prepare to be active participants in professional discourse communities by examining and practicing the writing conventions associated with their own fields of study and work. By calling attention to the conventions of disciplinary writing, the course also prepares students for upper-division college writing and the special conventions of advanced academic discourse. Course activities include three extended research papers, semi-formal writing addressing interdisciplinary communication, and readings fostering critical engagement with disciplinary conversations.
ENG 360 - Introduction to Creative Writing (4)
This course introduces the student to the world of creative writing, presenting the power of the written word, cultivating the individual's style in interpreting and writing poetry, fiction, and non-fiction, as well as drama. Participants will create a portfolio of work, mastering techniques employed by studied authors. Students also will learn strategies for generating ideas, becoming members of a community of writers who encourage and critique one another's craft by participating in writing workshops.
ENG 370 - Rhetorical Theory & Criticism (3)
In this course, students will examine the rhetorical theorists and theories that have informed current writing and communication practices. Theorists include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, Fish, Burke, Foucault, Kuhn, and Russell.
ENG 406 - Advanced Composition (3)
This course is a study in academic and professional writing, with an emphasis on designing and reporting primary research. Students will also examine and produce professional documents such as CVs, personal statements, and research agendas.
ENG 450 - Professional Editing: Theories & Practices (3)
In this course, students will examine different approaches to editing, while considering genre and rhetorical context, and practice those varying approaches. Students will also explore editing as a professional career and practice acting as editors for various class projects.
COMM 215 - Journalism and Media Writing (3)
In this course, students learn how to write news, editorials, features, scripts, and press releases for various types of traditional and broadcast formats. They also explore the processes associated with the marketing of those endeavors. In addition, the class serves as an introduction to the legal and ethical aspects of what to print/broadcast as well as the historical and contemporary contexts which influence these modern journalism and storytelling approaches.
COMM 241 - Media Design (3)
This course teaches the theories and practices associated with visual design principles, and layout for professional communication in traditional and new media formats. The focus of this course is on the creation of media content for use in promotion as well as a cursory overview of the Adobe image and web, creation and editing applications. Specifically, students will learn to utilize PhotoShop, InDesign, and Spark in the completion of these endeavors.
COMM 261 - Video Production (3)
This course focuses on the professional production of video content. Students learn the basics of the production process from start to finish, including writing scripts, lighting, audio, and camera basics as well as the process associated with directing and shooting content. Students also learn to use professional editing software as well as how to deliver their final work for use on television, mobile devices, internet and physical media.
University Electives

Any undergraduate courses offered by the University except developmental education courses. Please work with Academic Advising to determine the exact number of University Electives needed to complete the degree requirements.

Careers

What Can I Do with a Liberal Arts Degree?

With a liberal studies degree you really can have it all. From careers in communication, marketing, writing and editing to history, math or scientific endeavors, you can move on to great things after graduation.

Graduate school is a great choice for liberal studies graduates. The broad-based liberal studies major is a suitable preparation for a variety of advanced degrees, through which you can specialize your career focus or continue a tradition of lifelong learning.

Program Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate general principles from all traditional liberal arts fields and apply information and skills from the field of emphasis.

  2. Reason critically, analyze and solve problems objectively, and think creatively.

  3. Prepare and present information effectively, in both writing and speech, through research, discussion, and demonstration.

  4. Assess, critique, and reflect on their own personal moral and ethical values as well as those of other societies and cultures.

Undergraduate Studies Admission Requirements

Each applicant seeking admission to Urbana University is individually evaluated. Factors considered are past academic achievement, aptitude, extracurricular activities, and any additional evidence supporting the prospect of academic success.

To qualify for admission, applicants seeking an associate or bachelor's degree must present evidence of high school completion in the form of a high school diploma or GED. Careful consideration is given to the applicants academic record to include the curriculum, courses, and/or state mandated graduation tests. Results from standardized testing (either ACT or SAT) are required for first-time freshmen. Students who wish to apply for admission, but do not meet the minimum standardized test scores used for placement in University courses may be required to undergo placement testing.

Undergraduate admission requirements and materials:

A student who meets at least one of the following criteria is eligible for admission as a degree-seeking student:

  • Has provided official documentation of graduation from an accredited high school or its equivalent (see documentation required below), or
  • Has an associate, bachelor or master's degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher education, an institution recognized as a candidate for accreditation, or an institution recognized by the Council of Higher Education Accreditation

Documentation required:

1. Documentation of high school graduation or equivalence is required for applicants who are transferring fewer than 24 semester hours that apply towards a degree.

2. If the student has transferable hours of 24 credit hours or more from a regionally accredited institution of higher education, then they will not have to provide a high school diploma or equivalence. Acceptable forms of documentation of high school graduation or high school equivalence for undergraduate admission must include one of the following:

  • Official high school transcript listing the date of graduation
  • Official GED certificate
  • Official documentation of having passed a State High School Equivalency examination
  • Official documentation of a home school completion certificate/transcript
  • Official transcripts from all educational institutions (college, universities, professional schools, etc.) attended

3. Any applicant seeking to be a first-time freshman undergraduate degree-seeking students at Urbana University must supply standardized test scores (ACT SAT) to be used for placement in courses., to determine athletic eligibility, and/or determine institutional scholarship qualification.

At any time the University may require an applicant to meet with the Admissions Committee to address questions that arise in the application review process. If an applicant requests transfer credit, official transcripts from any other regionally accredited institution are required.

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