Johnny Appleseed Society

Johnny Appleseed Educational Center
& Museum

Barclay & Bailey Halls
Phone: 937-484-1303
Fax: 937-484-1322


The Johnny Appleseed Society supports the Johnny Appleseed program at Urbana University and the Johnny Appleseed Educational Center & Museum. The Society promotes the ideals by which John Chapman lived and the many roles he played in the development of the Northwest Territory. The Educational Center & Museum holds the largest collection of memorabilia and written information about the life of John “Appleseed” Chapman known to exist in the world. The collection has been used by Appleseed scholars for research and also serves as a clearinghouse of information. 

The programs sponsored by the Johnny Appleseed Society are intended to make history and good character traits “accessible” to children through the medium of the folk hero Johnny Appleseed and his legacy. They are also designed to support elementary educators who find that one of the best ways to influence their students' positive development is to combine their course work with character education, such as the traits found in Johnny Appleseed of self-reliance, community service, integrity, environmentalism, honesty, good citizenship, and loyalty.

Become a Society Member

Regular membership to the Johnny Appleseed Society is open to any individual upon payment of dues of $25 per year. Members receive a pin, certificate, and The Appleseed quarterly newsletter. Meetings are held monthly at the Johnny Appleseed Educational Center & Museum.

To inquire about membership to the Society, contact Museum Director Cheryl Ogden at (937) 484-1303, fax (937) 484-1322, or by e-mail cogden@urbana.edu.

The Appleseed Newsletter Archives

Spring 2013 Newsletter

Winter 2013 Newsletter

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From Our Faculty

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Urbana Faculty